Spring may bring new driving hazards

On Behalf of | Feb 25, 2020 | Personal Injury

Spring is right around the corner, and east coast residents are itching to shed off their winter gear and embrace warm weather once again. However, with the beginning of spring comes the aftereffects of winter weather on New York highways and roads.

According to AARP, drivers should anticipate several potential hazards before exploring the warmer conditions this spring.

Wet conditions

Spring is known for its rainy weather and slippery roads. It’s critical that drivers compensate for slippery conditions by slowing down and increasing the distance between you and other vehicles on the road. You also may notice large puddles on residential streets, so avoid those to prevent hydroplaning and brake issues.

Increased traffic

There will be more motorists on the road as the temperatures start creeping upwards, so you will need to be more diligent to avoid accidents, distracted drivers and other hazards on the highway. You may also need to be more aware of pedestrians in highly-populated areas such as cities or neighborhoods.

More Potholes Present

In the winter, it’s challenging to identify potholes with layers of ice or snow covering the roads. However, potholes are fully on display during the springtime, and drivers do not want to hit deep potholes if possible. When you hit a large pothole, it’s possible to ruin your tires and your car’s alignment. Your best bet is to avoid them whenever you can.

Animal Activity

Along with more motorists, you will notice more animals in rural areas and highways. Most animals are particularly active in the spring and may try to cross roadways or roam around, so watch out for furry critters (especially in the early morning and at dusk).

All these hazards could be a potential damper on your springtime activities, especially if it causes a motor vehicle accident. In those incidents, make sure to seek the right representation to ensure that you receive the compensation you need to cover medical bills and lost wages.

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